One one of the biggest days of your life, there are just some things that you shouldn’t do. Preparing yourself ahead of time will do you a lot of good in the long run. Here are some things that your medical school interviewer is probably thinking but won’t tell you.
I KNOW YOU’RE NERVOUS BUT YOU REALLY SHOULD HAVE REMEMBERED MY NAME 

Although it may seem like a minor detail, remembering your interviewer(s) name(s) is a bigger deal than you may realize. Not only does remembering matter, but if you’re able to throw their name in before or while you’re answering a question, you may also score a couple of points. If you don’t feel comfortable referring to them by name during the interview, it would be a nice end to the interview if you say “Thank You, so and so” to close your conversation. Don’t you know – people love to hear their own name! Remembering and using your interviewer’s name throughout your interview will help you feel a bit more comfortable and show your interviewer that you’re interested and involved in the moment. This is one of the small things that many students fail to focus on that can mean the difference of you standing out from the other applicants.

I REALLY WISH YOU WOULD’VE THOUGHT OF A LEAST ONE QUESTION TO ASK ME

It goes without saying that you should have at least one question to ask you interviewer during your time together. Whether it’s what they enjoy most about working or studying at the college/university or another questions spe- cific to the school’s curriculum or research program, you need to be prepared to ask a question even if your interviewer doesn’t ask you if you have any questions. When you do your research about the school you’re interviewing at beforehand, jot down any questions you may have.

YOUR BODY LANGUAGE IS SAYING A LOT MORE THAN YOU REALIZE

You may already know what you’re going to say during your medical school interview but what about what you’re going to do? Although many students may not think about the non-verbal cues they give off during their interview, body language can be just as important, if not more important than what’s actually coming out of your mouth. Your body language will tell your inter- viewer what’s going on with you whether you want them to know or not. Picking at your nails and looking up and around when answering a question are only a couple of the signals that you can give off during an interview and not realize what you’re “saying” to the other person across the table. Make sure that everything you’re doing with your body speaks confidence and truthfulness. Not sure of what not to do? Do a search on Google for body language 101 and you may learn a thing or two.

FROM THE MOMENT YOU WALKED IN I’VE BEEN COMPARING YOU WITH THE LAST APPLICANT

If you’re not the first person being seen by an interviewer, they will naturally compare you to the last person they just interviewed. So of course, you’re going to want to leave a lasting impression on the interviewer for as long as possible. You want them to still be thinking about you in a good way even after they’ve seen several applicants after you. If you’re “that good,” in their head they’ll be comparing every student who comes after you to your interview – and that’s a good thing! So be yourself and make the interview experience as memorable and meaningful as possible.

I CAN TELL HOW PASSIONATE YOU ARE ABOUT MEDICINE BY HOW YOU ANSWER MY QUESTIONS

With some of the unique questions interviewers are asking these days, it can be kind of hard to prepare answers to some possible questions. But there will be some questions, whether posed in a traditional way or not, which will probe your motivation and desire to pursue medicine. If you’re doing it for your parents, it will show in how you answer these questions whether you realize it or not. If you’re doing it for the money, it will show just the same. It’s important that you think about why you want to become a doctor and find a way to express your thoughts in a way that exudes passion and honesty behind your answer.